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hyperlink element (html)

Screen reader support level: partial (146/150)

Voice Control support level: partial (44/45)

On this page

About this feature

If the a element has an href attribute, then it represents a hyperlink (a hypertext anchor) labeled by its contents.

Age of results

Results across all tests for this feature range from a year ago to a year ago. Detailed dates and version information can be found in associated tests.

Caution

Failing or partial results may be out of date. The oldest result is from a year ago. Consider running the associated tests and contributing results.

Expectations

What are expectations?

Screen Reader support by expectation

ExpectationJAWSNarratorNVDAOrcaTalkBackVoiceOver (iOS)VoiceOver (macOS)
ChromeIEFirefoxEdgeChromeFirefoxFirefoxChromeSafariSafari
MUST convey its rolesupportedsupportedsupportedsupportedsupportedsupportedpartial (4/5)supportedsupportedsupported
MUST convey its namesupportedsupportedsupportedsupportedsupportedsupportedpartial (4/5)supportedsupportedsupported
MUST convey the boundaries of the elementsupportedsupportedsupportedpartial (4/5)supportedsupportedpartial (4/5)supportedsupportedsupported
SHOULD provide shortcuts to jump to this rolesupportedsupportedsupportedsupportedsupportedsupportedpartial (4/5)supportedsupportedsupported
MAY convey the visited statepartialpartialpartialnonesupportedsupportedsupportednonesupportedsupported

Voice Control support by expectation

ExpectationDragon Naturally SpeakingVoice Access (Android)Voice Control (iOS)Voice Control (MacOS)Windows Speech Recognition
ChromeChromeSafariSafariChrome
MUST convey its rolesupportedsupportednot applicablesupportedsupported
MUST convey its namesupportedsupportedsupportedsupportedpartial (4/5)

Expectation: convey its role

Rationale:

A screen reader user needs to know how they can interact with the element. Voice control software might use the role to help users activate controls that do not have a visible name.

Strength of this expectation for different types of assistive technologies:

  • Screen Readers: MUST
  • Voice Control: MUST

Examples:

  • A screen reader might announce a link as something like "<name>, link"
  • Voice control software might let a user say something like "click link"

Expectation: convey its name

Rationale:

A screen reader user needs to know what to enter.

Strength of this expectation for different types of assistive technologies:

  • Screen Readers: MUST
  • Voice Control: MUST

Examples:

  • A screen reader might announce a link as something like "<name>, link"
  • Voice control software might let a user say something like "click <name>"

Expectation: convey the boundaries of the element

Rationale:

A user needs to know when they enter and exit an element

Strength of this expectation for different types of assistive technologies:

  • Screen Readers: MUST
  • Voice Control: NA

Examples:

  • A screen reader might announce an inline link as something like "<name>, link"
  • A screen reader might announce when it enter and exits a links the spans multiple lines.
  • A screen reader might announce the link role for every line that the links spans

Expectation: provide shortcuts to jump to this role

Rationale:

Screen reader users might want to quickly navigate to elements of this type.

Strength of this expectation for different types of assistive technologies:

  • Screen Readers: SHOULD
  • Voice Control: NA

Expectation: convey the visited state

Rationale:

A user might want to know that they have already visted the link

Strength of this expectation for different types of assistive technologies:

  • Screen Readers: MAY
  • Voice Control: NA
Screen Reader support for 'MAY convey the visited state'
TestJAWSNarratorNVDAOrcaTalkBackVoiceOver (iOS)VoiceOver (macOS)
ChromeIEFirefoxEdgeChromeFirefoxFirefoxChromeSafariSafari
HTML links example 4 - A visited linkpartialpartialpartialnonesupportedsupportedsupportednonesupportedsupported